News and Facts about Cuba

The Countdown Begins For Raul Castro’s Departure From Power

The Countdown Begins For ’s Departure From Power / 14ymedio

14ymedio, Havana, 24 February 2017 — On February 24 of next year Raul
Castro must leave the presidency of Cuba if he is to fulfill the
promise he has made several times. His announced departure from power is
looked on with suspicion by some and seen as an inescapable fact by
others, but hardly anyone argues that his departure will put an end to
six decades of the so-called historical generation.

For the first time, the political process begun in January 1959 will
have a leader who did not participate in the struggle against the
dictatorship of Fulgencio Batista. Nevertheless, Raul Castro can
maintain the control of the Communist Party until 2021, a position with
powers higher than the executive’s and enshrined in the Constitution of
the Republic.

In the 365 days that remain in his position as of the Councils
of State and of Ministers, the 85-year-old ruler is expected to push
several measures forward. Among them is the Electoral Law, which he
announced two years ago and that will determine the political landscape
he leaves behind after his retirement.

In the coming months the relations between Havana and Washington will be
defined in the context of the new presidency of Donald Trump and, in
internal terms, by the . Low wages, the dual currency system,
housing shortages and shortages of products are some of the most
pressing problems for which Cubans expects solutions.

Raul Castro formally assumed the presidency in February of 2008,
although in mid-2006 he took over ’s responsibilities on a
provisional basis due to a crisis affecting his older brother
that forced him from public life. And now, given the proximity of the
date he set for himself to leave the presidency, the leader is obliged
to accelerate the progress of his decisions and define the succession.

In 2013 Castro was confirmed as president for a second term. At that
time he limited the political positions to a maximum of ten years and
emphasized the need to give space to younger figures. One of those faces
was Miguel Díaz-Canel, a 56-year-old politician who climbed through the
party structure and now holds the vice presidency.

In the second tier of power in the Party is Jose Ramon Machado Ventura,
an octogenarian with a reputation as an orthodox who in recent months
has featured prominently in the national media. A division of power
between Díaz-Canel and Machado Ventura (one as president of the Councils
of State and of Ministers and the other as secretary general of the
Party) would be an unprecedented situation for millions of Cubans who
only know the authority being concentrated in a single man.

However, many suspect that behind the faces that hold public office, the
family clan will continue to manipulate through pulling the strings
of Alejandro Castro Espín. But the president’s son, promoted to national
security adviser, is not yet a member of the Party Central Committee,
the Council of State or even a Member of Parliament.

For Dagoberto Valdés, director of the Center for Coexistence Studies,
Raúl Castro leaves without doing his work. “There were many promises,
many pauses and little haste,” he summarizes. He said that many hoped
that the “much-announced reforms would move from the superficial to the
depth of the model, the only way to update the Cuban economy, politics
and society.”

Raul Castro should “at least, push until the National Assembly passes an
Electoral Law” that allows “plural participation of citizens,” says
Valdés. He also believes that he should give “legal status to private
companies” and “also give legal status to other organizations of civil
society.”

The American academic Ted Henken does not believe that the current
president will leave his position at the head of the Party. For Henken,a
professor of sociology and Latin American studies at Baruch College in
New York, Castro’s management has been successful in “maintaining the
power of historic [generation] of the Revolution under the authoritarian
and vertical model installed more than half a century ago” and “having
established a potentially more beneficial new relationship with the US
and embarking on some significant economic reforms. ”

However, Henken sees as “a great irony that the government has been more
willing to sit down and talk with the supposed enemy than with its own
people” and points out “the lack of fundamental political rights and
basic civil liberties” as “a black stain on the legacy of the Castro
brothers.”

Regina Coyula, who worked from 1972 to 1989 for the
Counterintelligence Directorate of the Interior Ministry, predicts that
Raul Castro will be remembered as someone “who could and did not
dare.” At first she saw him as “a man more sensible than the brother and
much more pragmatic” but over time “by not doing what he had to do,
nothing turned out as it should have turned out.”

Perhaps “he came with certain ideas and when it came to reality he
realized that introducing certain changes would inevitably bring a
transformation of the country’s political system,” says Coyula. That is
something he “is not willing to assume. He does not want to be the one
who goes down in history with that note in his biography.”

Miriam Celaya recalls that “the glass of milk he
promised is still pending” and also “all the impetus he wanted to give
to the self-employment sector.” She says that in the last year there has
been “a step back, a retreat, an excess of control” for the private sector.

With the death of Fidel Castro, his brother “has his hands untied to be
to total reformist that some believed he was going to be,” Celaya
reflects. “In this last year he should release a little what the
Marxists call the productive forces,” although she is “convinced… he
won’t do it.”

As for a successor, Celaya believes that the Cuban system is “very
cryptic and everything arrives in a sign language, we must be focusing
on every important public act to see who is who and who is not.”

“The worst thing in the whole panorama is the uncertainty, the worst
legacy that Raul Castro leaves us is the magnification of the
uncertainty,” she points out. “There is no direction, there is no
horizon, there is nothing.” He will be remembered as “the man who lost
the opportunity to amend the course of the Revolution.”

“He will not be seen as the man who knew, in the midst of turbulence,
how to redirect the nation,” laments Manuel Cuesta Morua. Cuesta Morua,
a regime opponent, who belongs to the Democratic Action Roundtable
(MUAD) and to the citizen platform #Otro18 (Another 2018), reproaches
Raúl Castro for not having made the “political reforms that the country
needs to advance economically: he neither opens or closes [the country]
to capital and is unable to articulate another response to the autonomy
of society other than flight or repression.”

Iliana Hernández, director of the independent Cuban Lens,
acknowledges that in recent years Raúl Castro has returned to Cubans
“some rights” such as “buying and selling houses, cars, increasing
private business and the right to .” The activist believes that
this year the president should “call a free election, legalize
[multiple] parties and stop repressing the population.”

As for the opposition, Hernandez believes that he is “doing things that
were not done before and were unthinkable to do.”

Martha Cabello is very critical of Raul Castro’s
management and says she did not even fulfill his promise of ending the
dual currency system. “He spoke of a new Constitution, a new economic
system, which aren’t even mentioned in the Party Guidelines,” he says.

“To try to make up for the bad they’ve done, in the first place he
should release all those who are imprisoned simply for thinking
differently under different types of sanctions,” reflects Roque
Cabello. She also suggests that he sit down and talk to the opposition
so that it can tell him “how to run the country’s economy, which is
distorted.”

Although she sees differences between Fidel’s and Raul Castro’s styles
of government, “he is as like his brother,” she said. The
dissident, convicted during the Black Spring of 2003, does not consider
Diaz-Canel as the successor. “He is a person who has been used, I do not
think he’s the relief,” and points to Alejandro Castro Espín or Raul
Castro’s former son-in-law, Luis Alberto Rodríguez López-Callejas, as
possible substitutes.

This newspaper tried to contact people close to the ruling party to
obtain their opinion about Raúl Castro’s legacy, his succession and the
challenges he faces for the future, but all refused to respond. Rafael
Hernández, director of the magazine Temas, told the Diario de las
Américas in an interview: “There must be a renewal that includes all
those who have spent time like that [10 years].” However, not all
members of the Council of State have been there 10 years, not even all
the ministers have been there 10 years.”

This is the most that the supporters of the Government dare to say.

Source: The Countdown Begins For Raul Castro’s Departure From Power /
14ymedio – Translating Cuba –
translatingcuba.com/the-countdown-begins-for-raul-castros-departure-from-power-14ymedio/

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